Posts Categorized: Humanities

Video Clip: Battle of the Somme

Posted by & filed under Education, Humanities, Video.

World War I was the most futile war fought in human history. Millions of soldiers died in campaigns that saw little to no territorial changes due to the use of outdated tactics despite the addition of new weaponry. The attached video clip was created by the History Channel and provides an overview of one such […]

Infographic: Map of 3-Field System

Posted by & filed under Chart, Education, Humanities, infographic.

During the early Middle Ages agricultural production soared as the 3-Field System was emplaced. The 3-Fieldy System was far more efficient than traditional crop rotation as it allowed for the cultivation of 66% of the land instead of only 50% and allowed for two growing seasons instead of one. Not only did this system increase […]

Our Buggy Moral Code

Posted by & filed under Humanities, Ideas, metacognition, Science, TED, Video.

I want to use this talk to spark a discussion about whether our pre-reflective moral beliefs (the fancy term is “moral intuitions”) are always adequate or require additional training. http://ed.ted.com/lessons/our-buggy-moral-code-dan-ariely  

MET Blog Post

Posted by & filed under Humanities.

This is my first time posting on this site, so I hope I’m doing this right. Here is a link to a blog I found about humanities; it is the MET museum blog. MET Museum Blog  Great resources.  

Blog: History in the Crimea and Ukraine Today

Posted by & filed under Education, Humanities.

Understanding the complex relationship between Ukraine and Russia is pivotal to understanding the current unrest that is afflicting the area. In the blog “History in the Crimea and Ukraine Today” Professors Serhii Plokhii and Mark Kramer discuss the economic dependence that Ukraine has on Russia and how the Russian government has exploited that dependence to […]

Infographic: Modern Art History

Posted by & filed under Humanities.

Special thanks to Dana Thurmond, one of Valencia’s Humanities Professors, for sharing the following infographic with Circles of Innovation. This graphic shows students not just the timelines of certain periods, but how they interact with each other as well.